Louis Walton

The Long Wallet

The long wallet holds 10 cards and has four pockets for bills, receipts, and anything else you think you will need. It is a tad over 7 inches long and just about 4 inches wide. The one pictured has two id slots, because the client needed another slot for a second id. Since there is so much space in a long wallet it very customizable. The leather used for the cover is english bridle leather and the inside is the extra soft natural Essex from Horween. Essex is not talked about as much as shell cordovan or chromexcel, but it is a top notch leather that is perfect for card slots and the inside of wallets because of it’s soft feel. Both of these leathers take on a rich patina. The cover will end up being a deeper, richer, darker brown and the inside will also darken with use. Like all other leather goods I make, it is lined in leather and hand stitched.

Tie, belt, and pocket square by Louis Walton

Tie, belt, and pocket square by Louis Walton

A picture from WL in Hawaii of his Louis Walton watch strap.

A picture from WL in Hawaii of his Louis Walton watch strap.

For all the molskine lovers.  A leather case to fit an agenda or notepad.

For all the molskine lovers. A leather case to fit an agenda or notepad.

I am very happy to introduce the Louis Walton billfold wallet. It is an exceptional wallet that is currently being made with bridle leather, a lot of bridle leather. If all the leather used is stacked on top of each other it is about 1.5” tall and almost takes up 1.75 square feet if spread on a table with no gaps. After a lot of work, all of that leather is worked into a wallet that is 3.5” x 4” and less than half an inch thick. I wrote about the treatment of the edges in an earlier post and you will find some better pictures above.

The billfold six card slot wallet. It is sewn by hand with a saddle stitch and hand polished edges. One thing is different though. I usually color the edges with dye. Any color is possible but brown and black are used the most often. This time I went without color and the natural color of the leather shows through. The bottom left picture shows the color and the bottom right shows the finish in the edge.

Edges of leather goods are very important. As leather goods age, the edges really show the wear. One edge treatment is to put a product on the raw edges to color and coat them. One problem with this method is that it cracks when bent. Another method is to leave the edges raw. This starts out fine but over time it begins to look messy. The burnishing method I use is a combination of heat, dye, and lots of elbow grease. The result is a smooth polished edges that last a long time.

The question I am asked most often when someone sees one of my pieces is how did I do the edges. Attention to this detail is what distinguishes fine leather goods.

I affectionately call it “ugly green”. It will eventually find its way to a large watch with a black face.

I affectionately call it “ugly green”. It will eventually find its way to a large watch with a black face.

Weiss Watch with Louis Walton Strap

Everyone should know about Weiss watches. Each one is made by watchmaker Cameron Weiss in LosAngeles. We met in San Francisco last spring and I was amazed by the watch they had on display. Learn more at their website www.weisswatchcompany.com. The watch in the link above is a special edition and has a handmade Louis Walton strap.

brokeandbespoke:

Holiday Gift Idea #2: Louis Walton Hand Made Ties
I wrote the other day that I’d like to give a few gift-giving suggestions this holiday season, and I thought I’d do my best to focus on gifts that are hand made, rather than mass produced. So it was with Monday’s post about the scarves at Thorn Fiber Arts.
Today, I though I might recommend a different kind of neckwear, the long tie. Though I generally thrift my ties, I recently had the good fortune of receiving a couple of ties from San Francisco tie maker Gregory Walton, of Louis Walton Ties, and they’re quickly becoming some of my favorites. A high quality tie—and especially truly hand sewn ones that never see a sewing machine—can be quite expensive, but when it comes to thoughtful gift giving a splurge can be the first act in getting an item to a friend or loved one that becomes a cherished possession.
The aura that accrues around the knowledge that an item one is wearing was hand made from start to finish by a single person can elevate an item to a place of primacy in one’s wardrobe (I believe we make a fetish of this type of thing these days, and in these parts). An additional layer of sentiment can form around the fact that it was a gift from a special person (in this case, you). To that end, as far as hand made ties go I think Louis Walton makes some of the best I’ve seen. Though they’ll run you anywhere from $125-225, you can rest assured that they’ll likely become the recipient’s favorite tie.
* the tie pictured above is a beautiful unlined six-fold wool glen plaid with hand-rolled edges.  

Thanks. It is the best when others appreciate the work.

brokeandbespoke:

Holiday Gift Idea #2: Louis Walton Hand Made Ties

I wrote the other day that I’d like to give a few gift-giving suggestions this holiday season, and I thought I’d do my best to focus on gifts that are hand made, rather than mass produced. So it was with Monday’s post about the scarves at Thorn Fiber Arts.

Today, I though I might recommend a different kind of neckwear, the long tie. Though I generally thrift my ties, I recently had the good fortune of receiving a couple of ties from San Francisco tie maker Gregory Walton, of Louis Walton Ties, and they’re quickly becoming some of my favorites. A high quality tie—and especially truly hand sewn ones that never see a sewing machine—can be quite expensive, but when it comes to thoughtful gift giving a splurge can be the first act in getting an item to a friend or loved one that becomes a cherished possession.

The aura that accrues around the knowledge that an item one is wearing was hand made from start to finish by a single person can elevate an item to a place of primacy in one’s wardrobe (I believe we make a fetish of this type of thing these days, and in these parts). An additional layer of sentiment can form around the fact that it was a gift from a special person (in this case, you). To that end, as far as hand made ties go I think Louis Walton makes some of the best I’ve seen. Though they’ll run you anywhere from $125-225, you can rest assured that they’ll likely become the recipient’s favorite tie.

* the tie pictured above is a beautiful unlined six-fold wool glen plaid with hand-rolled edges.  

Thanks. It is the best when others appreciate the work.